Exhibition: The Wondrous World of Children's Book Illustrators

Stuff has been happening, guys!

Artwork and design by Mike Ciccotello

Artwork and design by Mike Ciccotello

This summer, I will be in a group exhibition of children's book illustrators with Mike Ciccotello, Yuko Katakawa, Melissa Iwai, Patricia Keeler, and Naroth Kean. The show will be held in the galleries of the Interchurch Center in New York, and will run from June 22nd to August 17th.

The opening reception is on June 22nd, just three days away from my birthday. I have to say, I consider this a pretty awesome birthday gift.

It's been a journey framing all of the pieces (since most of my work is digital and needed printing first). I'm so excited to exhibit with these amazing fellow illustrators! Here are the details:

Curated by Frank DeGregorie and Tracey Del Duca
Show runs from June 22 - August 17
Gallery Hours Mon-Fri, 9 - 5pm

Note: There are two entrances to our building (which takes up the block between 119th Street and 120th Street) --- 475 Riverside Drive and 61 Claremont Avenue--one block west of Broadway, at 120th St.

Subway Directions:
The Interchurch Center
475 Riverside Drive (or 61 Claremont Ave., one block west of B'way at 120th St.). Take #1 train to 116th Street, the Columbia University stop. Walk up Broadway to 120th Street, turn left, walk one block to Claremont Avenue. We are at 61 Claremont Avenue.

Process: Red Riding Hood's Valentine

Happy Valentines Day!

Most fairytales I know have themes that lend themselves very well to crossovers. I've combined Robin Hood and Snow White before, as well as Peter Pan and the Sandman story. This time, I'm combining Little Red Riding Hood with, well, the dreaded Queen of Hearts.

The next time you're prancing through the forest all by yourself, keep in mind that it's not the wolves you need to watch out for...

Messy thumbnails are messy.

Messy thumbnails are messy.

Most work indeed starts out like this scribbly mass of brushstrokes. While it wouldn't be the thumbnail I show to my client, it works for personal projects. All it takes is lightening this layer to prepare for step #2:

Sketch

Sketch

This sketch was a lot of fun to draw. It's on top of a grainy background in order to make it feel more like drawing on paper.

Just where did she get that heart?

Value

Value

This is where it starts getting eerie. I wanted to keep the foreground wolf dark, and the background wolf light, to play off a kind of "yin yang" theme. I'm also obsessed with the shadows that are cast by a hood over a face.

Beginnings of color.

Beginnings of color.

I was looking for something subdued, and a tad foggy. Hints of purple seem to do the trick. This is no sunny forest you dally through on your way to Grandma's! It was also important to keep the heart the rosiest point in the piece, even though her entire cloak is also red.

Refining the piece.

Refining the piece.

Bare trees don't have to be lifeless. There are plenty of animals still in the forest. Plus, they make nifty framing devices. Also can't forget the wolves' footprints in the snow.

Done!

Done!

You stick to your boxes of chocolate. Red has other plans. Thanks for reading!

Red Riding Hood Process